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ok i did a brake job on my car this past weekend and replaced all the pads in the rear as well as one of the calipers. i bled the caliper that i replaced, but that is the only one i did. when i got in my car to drive it, i noticed that the brake pedal went down farther than it did before, i would think that the pedal would be more touchy with new pads...my question is would bleeding the rest of the calipers get my old pedal pressure back ? thanks
 

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when you replace a caliper you are suppose to bleed all the brakes, if you don't you will most likely get air bubbles in the lines and the pedal will go "soft". You are suppose to bleed them in a certain order, i can't remember which. I believe you are suppose to start with the one closest to the master cylinder and go all the way to the furthest away. (on the mk2 the closest was the drivers side front) i don't know if it's the same on the mk4, as far as where the master cylinder is, but i'm almost positive you have to work from the closest to the farthest. Hopefully someone else will post a yes or no to this...... hope i could help.
 

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When you bleed brakes, you start at the wheel that is the greatest distance wheel. Bleed in this order:

Right Rear
Left Rear
Right Front
Left Front

You can bleed in many ways. The old school way is to have a helper pump the brakes, and then loosen the screw while the helper is pushing down on the brake pedal. Pump it up to gain pressure, and then hold the pedal and loosen the bleeder screw. Repeat until pedal feel is regained.

Other easier ways include Vacuum bleeding. You can buy a vacuum pump from a auto parts store, and they usually come with a little kit to vacuum bleed brakes. Simply add a little brake fluid to the bottle so that the end of the hose that goes down from the lid is submerged, hook up the port that attaches to that hose to the bleeder screw, and hook up the other side that doesn't have a hose that goes into the bottle up to your vacuum pump. Then start bleeding. Its simpler as it only requires yourself to do it.

The third way is Pressure Bleeding. We have a machine at work that does this, I believe it is called the VAS 5274. It has its own reservoir of brake fluid, and all you do is screw an adapter on to the cars master cylinder reservoir, hook up the hose, and then hook up shop air to the machine. It forces brake fluid into the system, pressurizing it. Then all you do is go to each wheel and bleed. This is also how your local dealership does Brake System flushes, which are recommended to be done every 2 years regardless of mileage by Volkswagen.

There are also Pressure-type bleeders available from tool manufacturers such as Snap-On, Matco Tools, Mac Tools, and so on.
 
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