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I have a 2004 Passat GLS. Can anyone please tell me what is the recommended air pressure for the tires?.

I tried looking for these details in owners manual, but could not find them.

thanks,
 

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For normal commuting, look inside the gas door, or on the tire itself and it should be listed.

For maximum performance, or autox, it could be different for different cars. Here is a good article that explains using chalk on your tires to determine correct air pressure. I have been doing this for a while when I get new tires, but this article explains it better than I can.

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><HR> Better Autocross or Track Performance with Chalk

In general tire air pressures between 35 and 45 psi are used for performance driving events. The higher than normal pressure will improve steering response, cornering traction, overall handling and tire performance.

The optimum air pressure depends on several factors including tire size, tire temperature, air temperature, driving style, track conditions, vehicle weight, and suspension settings.

To help determine the optimum tire pressure for time trials or autocross events all you need is a piece of chalk! Begin by rubbing the chalk on the sidewall of the tire and then move up to the tread blocks found in the shoulder area.

After you’ve chalked all four tires in various places around the tire’s circumference, take the car out for a few practice laps or perform some hard cornering maneuvers in a safe area.

Next, inspect the chalk marks and determine if any pressure changes need to be made. What you’re trying to achieve is to have the chalk rubbed off close to where the tread design ends in the shoulder area of the tire. If all the chalk is rubbed off a tire, add air pressure to the tire. If, on the other hand, most of the chalk is still on the tire, reduce the air pressure in the tire.

When adding or reducing air pressure to maximize performance, do so in 2 psi increments. Even minor changes in the air pressure can make a substantial difference in the way a car performs.

You can then fine tune the car’s handling by adding air pressure to the end of the car that needs additional traction. So, to reduce understeer add air pressure to the front tires.

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
 

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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Old Skool MK2:
holy crist u go oall into this thread and it's only tire pressure...lol<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

You would be surprised as to how much of an improvement in handling you can feel in real life, and see in a timed event from correct tire pressure, I feel it's pretty important stuff and thought this was a good thread to share it in in case someone ever searches the forum for "tire pressure" in the future.

Even in drag racing, I have seen consistently better 60' times by as much as .3 of a second by simply letting air out of the tires. A turboback exhaust which costs close to $1000 might give you .3 of a second in the 1/4 mile, so why not get the same gains out of something that costs nothing?
 

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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Big Dong:
For normal commuting, look inside the gas door, or on the tire itself and it should be listed.

For maximum performance, or autox, it could be different for different cars. Here is a good article that explains using chalk on your tires to determine correct air pressure. I have been doing this for a while when I get new tires, but this article explains it better than I can.

Better Autocross or Track Performance with Chalk

In general tire air pressures between 35 and 45 psi are used for performance driving events. The higher than normal pressure will improve steering response, cornering traction, overall handling and tire performance.

The optimum air pressure depends on several factors including tire size, tire temperature, air temperature, driving style, track conditions, vehicle weight, and suspension settings.

To help determine the optimum tire pressure for time trials or autocross events all you need is a piece of chalk! Begin by rubbing the chalk on the sidewall of the tire and then move up to the tread blocks found in the shoulder area.

After you’ve chalked all four tires in various places around the tire’s circumference, take the car out for a few practice laps or perform some hard cornering maneuvers in a safe area.

Next, inspect the chalk marks and determine if any pressure changes need to be made. What you’re trying to achieve is to have the chalk rubbed off close to where the tread design ends in the shoulder area of the tire. If all the chalk is rubbed off a tire, add air pressure to the tire. If, on the other hand, most of the chalk is still on the tire, reduce the air pressure in the tire.

When adding or reducing air pressure to maximize performance, do so in 2 psi increments. Even minor changes in the air pressure can make a substantial difference in the way a car performs.

You can then fine tune the car’s handling by adding air pressure to the end of the car that needs additional traction. So, to reduce understeer add air pressure to the front tires.

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

So your saying...if i put more air in the front tires and rear tires..like 32 and up..i will get better traction and handling?
 

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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Big Dong:
You would be surprised as to how much of an improvement in handling you can feel in real life, and see in a timed event from correct tire pressure, I feel it's pretty important stuff and thought this was a good thread to share it in in case someone ever searches the forum for "tire pressure" in the future.

Even in drag racing, I have seen consistently better 60' times by as much as .3 of a second by simply letting air out of the tires. A turboback exhaust which costs close to $1000 might give you .3 of a second in the 1/4 mile, so why not get the same gains out of something that costs nothing?
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

BD is right on with this one, guys. Tire pressure makes a world of difference depending on what you want your car to do. Suffice to say...the first time I ran my car at the track, I had lots of wheelspin that I normally didn't have on the street. Then I talked to Bill (climbingcue on Vortex, owned and built a 11.7 1/4 GTI VR6T) and he told me to let some air out of the front tires. Next pass I had was significantly quicker, with less wheelspin.

Wheelspin = cool for burnouts, not for racing
 

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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Big Dong:
For normal commuting, look inside the gas door, or on the tire itself and it should be listed.

For maximum performance, or autox, it could be different for different cars. Here is a good article that explains using chalk on your tires to determine correct air pressure. I have been doing this for a while when I get new tires, but this article explains it better than I can.

Better Autocross or Track Performance with Chalk

In general tire air pressures between 35 and 45 psi are used for performance driving events. The higher than normal pressure will improve steering response, cornering traction, overall handling and tire performance.

The optimum air pressure depends on several factors including tire size, tire temperature, air temperature, driving style, track conditions, vehicle weight, and suspension settings.

To help determine the optimum tire pressure for time trials or autocross events all you need is a piece of chalk! Begin by rubbing the chalk on the sidewall of the tire and then move up to the tread blocks found in the shoulder area.

After you’ve chalked all four tires in various places around the tire’s circumference, take the car out for a few practice laps or perform some hard cornering maneuvers in a safe area.

Next, inspect the chalk marks and determine if any pressure changes need to be made. What you’re trying to achieve is to have the chalk rubbed off close to where the tread design ends in the shoulder area of the tire. If all the chalk is rubbed off a tire, add air pressure to the tire. If, on the other hand, most of the chalk is still on the tire, reduce the air pressure in the tire.

When adding or reducing air pressure to maximize performance, do so in 2 psi increments. Even minor changes in the air pressure can make a substantial difference in the way a car performs.

You can then fine tune the car’s handling by adding air pressure to the end of the car that needs additional traction. So, to reduce understeer add air pressure to the front tires.

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I think you meant the lower the pressure for the tire, the better grip/traction you would get. People usually let air out of there tire when they gotta track to do there 1/4 mile...;-)
 

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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by GTI 1.8T:

I think you meant to lower the pressure for the tire for better grip/traction. If you put more air, you'll just never get traction and wheelspin like hell.....and it will slow down your time. People usually let air out of there tire when they gotta track to do there 1/4 mile...;-)
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
 

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what's the ideal pressure to set the tires at if you're about to run it at a drag?

I'm going to run my car in a week or so and I'm thinkin' about setting the tires to 28pounds. Is that good or could I go lower?
 

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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by White Rabbit:
what's the ideal pressure to set the tires at if you're about to run it at a drag?

I'm going to run my car in a week or so and I'm thinkin' about setting the tires to 28pounds. Is that good or could I go lower?
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


im sure you can a bit lower, my brother had his supra before, when he went to drags, he would put them at 24-26psi's...
 

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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by White Rabbit:
what's the ideal pressure to set the tires at if you're about to run it at a drag?

I'm going to run my car in a week or so and I'm thinkin' about setting the tires to 28pounds. Is that good or could I go lower?
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

At the drag strip, I go much lower than that. Lower tire pressure will lower your trap speeds, but it will also lower your overall time because of the better 60' times you will get. When I go, I pump the rear tires up as high as they allow (indicated on the side of the tire) for less rolling resistance, and I drop the front tires down to around 20psi. With the fronts at normal pressures, I am only able to cut consistent 2.3 60' times, and occasional 2.2's, and with them down to around 20psi, I can cut consistent 2.2 60' times and occasional 2.1's. In general, every .1 of a second you can cut off your 60' time, you will typically cut .2 off your total time.

Here is a pic of my ride at Maple Grove in the return lanes cooling down, you can see how low the front tire pressure is pretty well in this pic.



[ February 05, 2004: Message edited by: Big Dong ]
 
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