VW Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey peeps! So I'm changing my timing belt on my 2003 1.8t jetta wolfsburg edition and am having trouble lining up my flywheel tdc mark. I've aligned the mark on the valve cover and lower timing belt cover but I cant find the mark on the flywheel, even when I crank the crank :p
What I do see is these two holes. Are these the timing marks that show TDC and 6degres before?? I didn't expect them to be were I circled.


I've done a timing belt on a 2.0 and I remember the tdc mark was fairly simple to find.
Also just to put it out there I'm doing the timing belt because a code came up saying the timing was advanced. How does this happen if it doesn't jump a tooth?? tensioner going bad?? just curious. Thanks for any help, cheers!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Should I not worry about the mark on the flywheel and rely on the two marks on the valve cover and lower timing cover??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
When i did the timing belt and shit on my 1.8t i didnt use the one on the flywheel to much of a pain to even find. Set mine off the 2 on the covers. Worked great for me. And if you do the belt you have to do the tensioner. Well you should atleast.....its not good to re compress them once you pull the release clip out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
981 Posts
you can recompress the tensioner, youjust need to do it slowly to not hurt the mechanism.

VW/AUDI make a special tool to do so. Essentially its a long screw with a washer on top. I made one for a few bucks at lowes. and keep it in the box at all times!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Well there ya go. I was told not to recompress them also and i did with mine. Worked fine for me but if ya mess it up your going to be pulling your engine apart again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I ended up braking the camshaft timing sensor as I was putting the timing belt cover so I had to wait a week for that part to come in. She sounds like she runs fine but when I full throttle it sounds like the turbo surges and then drops. It does that repeatably in full throttle and isn't very smooth acceleration.
One big thing, I plug my scanner in and p0340 Camshaft Position Sensor A circuit (Bank 1) code comes up.
In my mind I'm thinking the N75 valve is busted or my timing is off... That would be a bummer but whatever. So what do you all think?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Jetta 2.0 Timing belt alignment

I just got done replacing the water pump on an AEG 2.0L. Quite an experience but I was able to do it without any special tools. I ended up having to reset the timing belt and it was not that hard. Here's how:

I was able to get a 19mm socket (3/8" base) wedged between the plastic splash guard and into the crankshaft pulley. I slipped a 3/4"X18" iron pipe over the ratchet handle to get extra leverage and get the handle clear of the engine. Some duct tape on the socket handle and end of the pipe will hold it from slipping. Set the ratchet to tighten so you are turning the crankshaft clockwise as you look at it from the passenger side.

While the belt is off, make sure the crankshaft is NOT at TDC, recommend about a quarter rotation away either direction. There are two ways to identify TDC. The first and easiest is to look straight down on the top of the crankshaft pulley and behind it. On the case, right behind the pulley, you will see a vertical notch. As you rotate the crank, you will see a notch on the behind the pulley. First go through TDC about a quarter rotation so you can set the camshaft without damaging the valves. The throw on the ratchet is small so it may take dozens of throws to get a full turn on the crankshaft but better than trying to pull off the splash guard and crankshaft pulley as described in many other videos and blogs. To verify TDC, you can check the flywheel on the transmission side of the engine. It is hard to see, but there is a rubber oval shaped plug on the top of the tranny bell. You will have to stand on the driver side and probably move some rubber lines out of the way to see it. Just pull on the plug to remove it. There are two holes and you want to look into the larger one closer to the engine (with gears in view). You will have to move around and shine a bright flashlight there to get a good view. At TDC, you will see a 0 mark. For manual tranny, this is lined up directly in the center of the window. For auto, I believe it is lined up on the right edge (recommend research that one as I did a manual).

Next, set the camshaft to TDC by placing the 19mm socket on and lining up the notch on the camshaft pulley with the arrow on the case, again rotating clockwise. Now return to the crankshaft and set it to TDC as described earlier.

Now, the tensioner should be set to the lowest setting. I was able to use a long standard screwdriver to push on the eccentric cam in the center instead of buying the special tool or using the 90 deg needle nose (since I don't have one). Basically, you will see a flat spot on the cam on either side of the nut which the screwdriver tip can push on to align the cam as needed. With the cam 180 away from the belt (least tension), ensure the belt is seated on the crankshaft timing belt gear and over the water pump gear. With the belt over the tensioner, take out any slack and line the teeth of the belt up on the cam pulley. To get the belt on the rest of the way, work the edge of the belt over the cam pulley little by little until the edge of the belt is on top of the pulley. It might take some pulling but DO NOT move the cam pulley or the crank pulley during the process. Center up the belt on the cam and water pump pulleys.

Next, set the tension by pushing on the left side of the cam with the long standard screwdriver. Reach around the back of the left side of the tensioner as you do this and you will feel a lever move clockwise the harder you push. You will also feel an indexer at about the 10 o'clock position. The goal is to push on the cam with the screwdriver until the tension lever moves up to the indexer. Then tighten the 13mm nut on the tensioner. Once it is tight, double check the lever is still lined up with the indexer by feeling behind the tensioner.

If you want, rotate the crank through a rotation to check nothing is binding. You have now set the timing.

I also ran the engine for just a few seconds to make sure all was right.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top